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Search Results 55 to 78 of about 79 (some duplicates have been removed)
now to see if you can bring the taliban into real peace negotiations so that we would leave with something like a settlement. we could say "here look, we're leaving but there's an agreement among these factions." >> schieffer: and you just had the president of afghanistan karzai saying he's going to forbid any more american airstrikes. he won't allow his own people to call in airstrikes because a recent one took some civilian lives. >> reporter: concern about hitting civilian areas. that's right. i think one of the other offshoots of this drop-down will be a continued presence in some form is where those asset goes. and the theory keeps getting floated what leaves afghanistan may go to the benefit of forces in within africa because of this new threat that has come to the fore and really been highlighted in terms of aqim, their presence in libya and algeria as we saw with the hostage crisis that just happened. but what that means is it's certainly not boots on the ground. it's just assets -- >> schieffer: the president didn't have much to say about iran or north korea during
a charge against taliban fighters who had attacked a small outpost in 2009. eight americans died in that battle. we honor the service of romesha and all of those soldiers. and finally, your voice this week, the question comes from yasin, who asks "where can i rewatch your programs?" well, thank you for watching. every episode is available at our website, abcnews.com/thisweek or check out our web only interviews like this morning newt gingrich will be sticking around to answer your questions. that's all for us today. thank you for sharing part of your sunday with us. check out "world news with david muir" tonight. george will be back next week and we hope you will too. ♪ ♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, every innovation, every solution, comes together for a single purpose -- to make the world a safeplace. that's the valueof per. nonorthrop grumman. i work for 47 didifferent companies. well, technically i work for one. that company, the united states postal service®, works for thousands of home businesses. because at usps.co
and killed a police officer there protecting the workers. the taliban commander by way of background banned the vaccinations. says at least ten health care workers have been killed since december. pakistan, one of just three countries where polio remains a threat. >>> and kazakhstan, talks are under way about iran's nuclear program. there are representative there's from iran, germany, and the five permanent members of the united nations security council. the u.s., france, britain, russia, china. since last round of talks last june, iran's uranium enrichment program has expanded violating u.n. resolutions. >> iran's claiming its program is for civilian use only, energy and such things but western leaders fear iran is building a nuclear bomb. >>> canada, a group of scientists is now calling for food to be dna tested to make sure these things, products, are what they say they really are. >> now paula newton will report test willing keep horse meat from ending up in beef products and other types of food fraud. >> reporter: with all of the new food scares i bet you're wondering if there's any wa
of the president. i support him. we cannot change the equation at this point in time. the taliban have been determined to relentlessly attacked the afghan government. we have to not pull out and make sure we focus on a counterterrorism strategy compared to the surge strategy, which did not accomplish its goal. host: another word that was not mentioned was the use of drones in the confirmation hearing. guest: this is a controversial subject. i fall on the side of supporting our drone program relentlessly sorting our drone program to protect our troops and to prevent the united states from being harmed by terrorists. when al qaeda operatives were taken out by drones >>> in afghanistan and yemen -- by drone strikes in afghanistan and elsewhere, i commended the president for his counterterrorism policy. it has protected the homeland as best as any weapon we could have. it has been an effective way of putting al qaeda on the defense and keeping them on the run. the president deserves congratulations for being relentlessly consistent and persistent in his drone program. does that mean it has been
. it was to liberate because the plan was overthrow saddam, get out of there, just like we overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and god as they are and of course afghanistan fell apart and we had to go through that. we are facing an insurgency. we don't know what to do. all the officers there hadn't been trained to fight this sort of war. the listening manuals. they did what they usually do, banged on doors and arrest and kill people and anyone who had read kahlÚa or naco what now is counterproductive because you end up killing the wrong people. he off their cousins and brothers who may become insurgents, too. so petraeus in mozilla decides to put into effect the ideas he's learned. so he and his guys, they start setting up an election for the new district council. they said at the elections. they bring in field trip from turkey. they get communications systems going. they get iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens at the border to syria along northern iraq. he does all this on his own. he's not touring with coronation of anybody, washington or baghdad or any place that works for a while and th
the medicine 2001. we met our goal to get rid of al qaeda. we have under the taliban government and set the country started into screenplay, we developed some more responsibility for helping him set a rate third, i think it's an america in the center a stable region. if afghanistan were completely unstable, who'd be very tenuous but it's important. we need to be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are so nervous is because in 2004 they think we're going to leave and 18 asleep before. in 1889, we turn from the region. it doesn't matter whether each individual afghans saw that, it's become commonly accepted truth they don't have other strategic allies. so what they're looking for in my view is the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. but i think that's a specific number of troops, even a specific amount of money. their fear is they are very far away. i was asking him this question. i said what you want in the future years quite homage to see what here? said a word about business and i'll be here taking money. because if you're making money here
in afghanistan against all odds during a taliban attack. he says u.s. a high honor and a heavy burden. >> i stand here with mixed emotions of both joy and sadness. the joy comes from recognition for us doing our jobs as soldiers on distant battlefields. but it's countered by the constant reminder of the loss of our battle buddies. >> somber man. a somber and serious ceremony. but romesha's just adorable son stole the show with his antics. playing hide and seek with the press. >>> dogs for days, primped pooches strutting to win over judges at the westminster dog show in new york. best in show will be crowned tonight. judges picked winners in four categories, best of sporting, working, and terrier groups coming up today. terriers hope to continue their unfounded dominance at the dog show. >> it's so great. i have never gone in person. >> i have. a lot of times. one of the stories they make you cover again and again and again. >>> ahead this morning, we'll continue to talk about north korea, they say their overnight nuclear test in response to u.s. hostility and that stronger actions could be on the
three kids. in october everything change would. a predawn ambush in the pakistan border. 300 taliban stormed the base where 50 american soldiers became sitting ducks in a valley surrounded by mountains owned by the income. >> what happened next is one of the most intense battles of the entire war in stanford. the attackers had the advantage and high grounds and mountains above and unleashing everything they h. >> the sergeant and others jumped from their bids and he managed to call in air support that killed 30 insurgent. rockit grenad explode cent chap nel in his hip and arm and neck. came within 10 feet. >> they charged and they kept 50 meters and 80s and 100 meter run through a hail of bullets . they reached their fallen frinds and they brought them hoim. >> staff sergeant clint romesha is a reb luctant hero. >> this awarted is for the eight soldiers that didn't make it and the rift of the team that fought valiently and magnif stently that day. >> their parents were at the white house for the medal of honor ceremony. his fellow soldiers would follow staff sergeant roimsha to hell
clinton romesha. he prevented a u.s. outpost in afghanistan from being overrun by taliban fighters in 2009 after being hit by shrapnel from a rocket-propelled grenade. >> "we weren't going to be beat that day," clint said. "we were not going to back down in the face of diversity like that. we were just gone -- just going to win, that simple." god bless you, clint romesha, and all of your team. god bless all who serve and god bless the united states of america. [ applause ] >> eight american servicemen died in that fire-fight. one of the most intense in the afghan war. in a lighter moment before the ceremony, romesha's 1-year-old son, that would be colin, stole some hearts. he jumped on stage and played peek-a-boo behind the president's podium before being escorted off to his mother's arms. >> by a marine. >> you go take him, mom. not many people can say they played peek-a-boo at the white house behind the president's podium. >> adorable >>> look up in the sky. it's not a bird. it's not even a plane. >> reporter: had can carry 66 tons yet is lighter than air? you're looking at it. find out
out secret effort to persuade the taliban to expel bin laden. as we know, bin laden was not expelled. three months later, his wrath was unleashed with an attack on our embassies. did you advise director tenant against this operation? and if so, why? >> i had a conversation with george and that at the time. every single cia manager, george tennant as deputy director of operations at the time, and other individuals at the counter-terrorism center argued against that operation as well because it was not well grounded in intelligence, and its chances of success were minimal. and it was likely that other individuals would be killed. when i was involved in those discussions, i provided the director and others my professional advice about whether i thought that operation should go forward. i also was engaged in discussion with the saudi government at the time. and i encouraged certain action to be taken to put pressure on the taliban as well as bin laden. >> i take it that your answer to my question is that you did advise in favor of the cancellation of that operation. >> based on what i ha
. the medal of honor. he was at a combat outpost in afghanistan in 2009 when 300 taliban fighters launched an ambush. he managed to call air support that caught 30 insurgents and risked his life. >> there have been eight soldiers that didn't make it. for the rest of the team that fought valiantly and magnificently that day. i will forever be humbled by the bravery, the commitment to service and their loyalty to one another. >>gretchen: before the ceremony, romesha's son actually stole the show. the president's podium, he tried to climb on top of it and then dashed to the front row. >>steve: you know dr. ben carson was a keynote speaker at the national prayer breakfast last week. he is an esteemed neurosurgeon at johns hopkins tphe baltimore area. because it was a prayer breakfast, he took a look at the bible and applied some biblical teachings on where we are today. he talked about the national debt, health care and he talked about taxes. despite the way we're doing it right now, it really should be fair. why did he do that? here's the good doctor. >> somebody has to be courageous enough t
environment. she also obviously trains every day. >> right. she was something to be feared. i know the taliban sees these military working dogs as a precious target to them because they're keeping you safe. we watched a video of her ripping somebody to shreds. >> they're a valuable asset in every part over there. they play the ability for them to do what they do is just -- there is nothing that beats it. , a lot of people are putting their lives in their hands. >> leonard, six months ago, it's hard to believe this was just six months ago, early morning in july, take us back when she saved your life. >> technically she did. technically. she did two days prior, she had alerted behavior of an ied, which we called up the expert. that's one situation. she was on the right side of the road. stayed to the left side of the road. >> what happened to you? there was a crazy explosion. i think we've got video of that. we want to take a listen. >> staff sergeant len anderson and his working dog are on patrol near the taliban strong hold. >> got my scout. >> you feel like you would have died if it weren't f
decoration. it reflects the gratitude of our entire country. >> reporter: this video was shot by the taliban on the day that army staff sergeant romesha helped repel their attack. more than 300 enemy fighters against his unit of 53 men, defending an outpost the president called tactically indefensible. >> these men were outnumbered, outgunned and almost overrun. >> reporter: he's credited with retaking the outpost. and helping save many of his brothers in arms. but more than 20, including romesha, were injured and eight were killed. their families were here and he spoke to us about them. no doubt that your fallen comrades are going to be in that room with you. >> they'll be there, i just know it. >> reporter: many of his fellow soldiers were here. romesha told us the medal belongs to them, too. a somber occasion to be sure, although his 18-month-old son colin nearly stole the show before it started. you're out of the military. what are your dreams and aspirations and hopes now? >> to be that dad and father, that husband. they've really missed out on the 11 years i was in, and to watch them g
and this kid is out there in the middle of nowhere with 400 taliban and in the middle east and he's tremendously courageous and tremendously brave and taking them on saving not only fellow soldiers, but ultimately saving database. ask about bravery and courage go on often every day in a war zone and i just think it's difficult to think that everybody who performs in that kind of fashion that somehow we have to establish, you know, a separate fund to try to assist them. the reality is that men and women in uniform put their lives on the line every day. it's a sacrifice for this country. and i think the great thing about this country is that there are those that are willing to do that and not worry about whether or not they're going to get an award for additional pay, but they just do it because they love this country. >> secretary, why did you, general dempsey and secretary clinton recommend that the u.s. provide weapons to the rebel forces in syria? were you disappointed the white house turned that down? and do you think is the result of that that this war could go on endlessly? >
error. a 7% decline in violence in afghanistan last year, turns out was inaccurate. taliban attacks held steady. and militants killed 17 people overnight, including ten afghan police officers while they slept this in the gazni province in afghanistan. >>> dennis rodman is in north korea, of all places. with three members of the famed harlem globetrotters to put on a show for fans while she film a tv documentary. rodman, known as the worm, tweeting from inside north korea and saying maybe i'll run into the gangnam style dude while i'm here. psy, he is south korean, not north korean. >> a little bit of a problem. >> a big difference. >> i haven't heard the nickname the worm since about 1999. >> rodman, bad as i want to be. >> yet there he is tweeting from north korea. >>> still ahead two days until $85 billion in forced budget cuts go into effect. can congress get past the finger pointing, or is it too late for compromise? we'll speak with steve israel. >>> and business news to discuss too. >> scandal surrounding the vatican as the pope prepares to step down. from accusations of corruption
. >> gretchen: thanks so much. >> thank you. >> gretchen: coming up, taliban despises us. the muslim brotherhood wants to destroy us. can we afford to make defense cuts then right now? general bob scales next. [ male announcer ] how do you make america's favorite recipes? just begin with america's favorite soups. bring out chicken broccoli alfredo. or best-ever meatloaf. go to campbellskitchen.com for recipes, plus a valuable coupon. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> i'm bill hemmer. nothing like a bombshell to start the week. the pope is resigning, full and complete reaction on this breaking story. 67 million american catholics. and a world of intrigue for who is the next leader of the church. there is news on the manhunt in california. epic snowfall as many scramble this morning. martha and i will see you in nine short minutes here on "america's newsroom." brian, back to you. >> brian: unless congress cuts a deal on our debt by march 1, our military will face deep cuts. is this something we can afford, especially when we have so many enemies around the world, like north korea, the
and defeated the taliban on our behalf not the mean he of our enemy, but these are radical islamic jihadists who want a cal fate -- caliphate in which the united states is sub jew dated to a religious -- subjugated to a religious ruler and they are willing to use violence if necessary, although the muslim brotherhood now seems to indicate that here in america they have made so much progress in infiltrating and getting positions of power in our government, our state department, in our homeland security department, in our justice department, at the white house directly, and direct lines to the president, they have made so much progress in moving toward that goal of a caliphate here in the united states under shari'a law, not under the constitution, that they are thinking maybe violence is not the way forward in america to achieve their goal of making this a shari'a compliant caliphate. but the muslim brotherhood around the world believes many places violence is the way forward in those areas. but we've got to understand who we are facing and what they want to do. and secretary clinton, unfortu
Search Results 55 to 78 of about 79 (some duplicates have been removed)

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